Gallery Seven – Pastel Landscape and Still Life

Behind the playing fields, Peace Garden and picnic grounds, Sebastopol’s Ragle Park opens to a grand field, spring wildflowers above a marshland and blackberry tunneled trails.

Behind the playing fields, Peace Garden and picnic grounds, Sebastopol’s Ragle Park opens to a grand field, poppies and many more wildflowers above a marshland and blackberry tunneled trails. Atascadero creek below meanders near the park’s lower boundary.

 

Shifting light calls attention to color and texture, first poppies, now lupine as some wildflowers close up and vanish in clouds and dusk.

Shifting light calls attention to color and texture, first poppies, now lupine as some wildflowers close up and vanish in clouds and dusk.

What I’m aiming for are moments of strong sensation ⎯ moments of total physical experience of the landscape, when weather just reaches out and sucks you in. And the challenge of trying to trigger those moments with pigments of ground-up earth. When you think about it, it’s really very mysterious.
– Jane Wilson, 1991

PASTEL INFLUENCES IN MY LIFE

What came first . . . drawing, drawing, drawing, crayons, going outside the lines in coloring books where there was room to play with color. I always loved mark making, and navigating the shapes of spaces between and around objects. Pastels were a natural transition. My Skidmore College teacher, Arnold Bittleman, an extraordinary mark maker and pastelist, introduced us to Impressionists and Postimpressionists who painted in pastel as well as oil, including Edgar Degas, Odilon Redon, and Toulouse Lautrec. I later discovered Mary Cassatt, Berthe Morisot, Pierre Bonnard, Jane Wilson, and Wolf Kahn, contemporary Impressionist/Realist/Abstract Impressionist/Color Field painter, with whom I was fortunate to study for an intensive month of daily plein air painting in New Mexico.

 

 

 

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3 thoughts on “Gallery Seven – Pastel Landscape and Still Life”

  1. What a lovely format to showcase your beautiful work. Inspiring!

  2. Marsha Connell said:

    Thank you for visiting, Catherine.

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